Are you accepting clients?

Are you accepting clients?

I am currently out of the office until June 26th. Therefore I will be in touch with new clients upon my return. I will be accepting adults, teens and couples/partners. I have openings on Wednesdays and Fridays.

 Please Contact Me to see if we’d be a good fit.

What is your fee?

What is your fee?

My rate for 50-minute, individual sessions is $180, and $200 for couples or extended (75-minute) sessions. I have a limited number of sliding scale slots for local teachers and/or those with financial needs. Please inquire during our consultation.

Payment is accepted via cash, check, credit card, Venmo, Zelle, or Paypal. Payment is due at the time of session.

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Additional information regarding fees:

The No Surprises Act, effective January 1, 2022, aims to provide patients/clients from receiving unanticipated medical bills.

Part of this means that you are entitled to receive a Good Faith Estimate explaining how much your mental health care will cost. While it is not possible for a psychotherapist to know, in advance, how many psychotherapy sessions may be necessary or appropriate for a given person, you have the right to receive a Good Faith Estimate for the total expected cost of your psychotherapy services. Your total cost of services will depend upon the number of psychotherapy sessions you attend, your individual circumstances, and the type and amount of services that are provided to you.

For example an individual who works with me 1x/ week would spend approximately $680-850/month on psychotherapy services, or $8,840/year. A couple attending 1x/week would expect to pay $800-1,000/month or $10,400/year.

You can ask your psychotherapist, and any other provider you choose, for a Good Faith Estimate before you schedule a service. If you receive a bill that is at least $400 more than your Good Faith Estimate, you can dispute the bill. Make sure to save a copy or picture of your Good Faith Estimate.

For questions or more information about your right to a Good Faith Estimate, visit www.cms.gov/nosurprises or call 1-800-985-3059.

Are there people you don’t work with?

Are there people you don’t work with?

I am not currently accepting young children as clients, nor families. Also, keep in mind that I travel several weeks per year, and will make schedule adjustments accordingly. If I cannot meet your needs, I will help to refer you to find a therapist who might be a better fit for you.

Are you working in person or via telehealth?

Are you working in person or via telehealth?

I am working both via telehealth, as well as in-person.

I do teletherapy via video-conferencing using the Zoom platform. Telehealth is available to CA residents only and clients must be located in the state of CA during the duration of the session. I will confirm your exact location at the outset of the session for safety purposes.

If you prefer in-person therapy, my office is located at: 15814 Winchester Blvd., Suite 105 in Los Gatos. I have a limited number of in-person slots available. Masks are currently required while in the waiting room.

What’s the difference between in person and teletherapy?

What’s the difference between in person and tele-therapy?

Telehealth/teletherapy is the practice of delivering services via electronic means when a counselor and a client are in two locations. There are possible risks including technology failures, interruptions, potential breaches of confidentiality and limited ability to respond to emergencies. If there is a crisis that cannot be resolved remotely it may be determined that telehealth services are not appropriate and another level of service (such as in-person) is required.

Telehealth can be a helpful option because it is available to residents living anywhere in CA. Keep in mind that clients must be residents of and located in the state of CA during the duration of the session. I will confirm your exact location at the outset of the session for safety purposes. If we get disconnected during a session I will make an attempt to contact you and reconnect, but interruptions may occur.

Both types of therapy services can be effective. And there are many considerations to make when determining your preference. Here are some factors you may want to take into account:

  • Do I have privacy at home during session time?
  • How closely timed is therapy to my next obligation/responsibility?
  • How comfortable am I with using technology?
  • Do I feel comfortable working with my issues via video-conferencing?
  • Is working in-person a major health risk for me?
  • Am I okay wearing a facemask during therapy?
  • How will the somatic/experiential part of therapy be impacted?
  • How might my needs be best met?

Do you take insurance?

Do you take insurance?

The short answer is no, I do not.

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I am an “out-of-network” provider for all insurance companies. That means I do not contract or work directly with insurance. This allows me to provide care that is independent from any insurance-based rules or decisions.

Although I understand that many clients are interested in using their insurance benefits, I believe it’s important to inform you of the following:
  • When using insurance, treatment needs to be “medically necessary”, therefore a mental disorder diagnosis is required.
  • When using insurance, a diagnosis remains on a client’s permanent record.
  • When using insurance, you must be “sick enough” for coverage to be provided. In other words, to continue therapy each session must be clinically justified. Many normal life struggles and transitions I serve may not meet criteria for a justifiable and reimbursable diagnosis.
  • When using insurance, the amount and course of treatment can be dictated by a utilization review process.

I provide a superbill at the end of each month which can be submitted directly to an insurance provider for reimbursement. Many clients can be reimbursed up to 50 to 80% for the cost of their sessions, but it may depend.

If you intend to use your insurance, please check your coverage carefully. I recommend that you contact your insurance provider prior to our initial meeting to better understand your insurance benefits and the reimbursement policy for an “out-of-network” provider.

To learn more about your mental health coverage, here are a few recommended questions to consider:
  • Does my policy cover out-of-network outpatient psychotherapy for me?
  • Is there a limit to the number of visits allowed?
  • Is a physician’s referral required?
  • Do I need pre-authorization?
  • Do I have a deductible? Have I met the deductible for this year?
  • What percentage of my therapy costs will be covered?
  • Which address do I send statements to?
  • Are there additional forms to be sent with my statement?

Clients have also been successful in utilizing a Health Savings Account (HSA) and/or Flexible Spending Account for reimbursement of accrued therapy expenses.

Is the office wheelchair accessible?

Is the office wheelchair accessible?

Yes! Though my office is located on the second story of our building, there are both stairs and a ramp for access.

What are the benefits and risks of therapy?

What are the benefits and risks of therapy?

Therapy provides you with a safe environment to talk about and process your mental, emotional and relational concerns. It can help you develop coping skills, make behavioral changes, reduce symptoms of mental health disorders, improve the quality of your life/relationships, learn to express emotions, learn to live in the present, and a host of other advantages.

However, benefits and certain outcomes are not guaranteed and, though relatively few, there are some risks involved. As you can probably surmise, growth through therapy rarely happens without encountering pain. Therapy is an intensely personal process, which can bring unpleasant memories or emotions to the surface. Because it can explore painful feelings and experiences, you may feel emotionally uncomfortable at times. Additionally, things may feel as though they are getting worse initially. However, risks are minimized by working with a skilled therapist who can match the type and intensity of therapy with your needs.

If psychotherapy isn't helping, talk to your therapist. If you don't feel that you're benefiting from therapy after several sessions, talk to your therapist about it. Unfortunately, there is no such thing as a guarantee. As such, there are risks that the returns from your investment in therapy may not meet your expectations. You and your therapist may decide to make some changes or try a different approach that may be more effective.

How often should I go?

How often should I go?

Most clients benefit from attending therapy 1x/week. However, if circumstances warrant, clients may come more often (2-3x/week) or less often (e/o week). We can discuss timing and availability during our consultation.

How do you protect my privacy?

How do you protect my privacy?

Confidentiality is a cornerstone that differentiates the therapist-client relationship from many other relationships. As such, client identity and information discussed during sessions will remain confidential unless you, the client, authorize a release of the information. For example, it might be important that I contact someone in your healthcare team, or perhaps you might want to bring a family member or friend in for a collaborative session. Under those circumstances I would require your written permission prior to making contact, and we would also discuss in advance the degree of disclosure you would feel comfortable with me making.

I work to preserve the integrity of client privacy, consistent with sound ethical/clinical practice and maintain confidentiality as mandated by the law. Your privacy is protected in a variety of ways, some of which include securing session notes and client records, utilizing Zoom privacy features, and even protecting your anonymity should we ever come to meet in a public setting (meaning you would initiate any acknowledgement that we know each other). 

However, please know that there are legal exceptions to keeping your confidentiality, such as:

  • When a person is a danger to self
  • When a person is a danger to others
  • Upon receipt of a valid court order
  • Where there is suspicion of child abuse
  • Where there is suspicion of elder abuse

I take your privacy seriously. Though you are free to email me with logistical requests such as appointment rescheduling, be advised that electronic communication is not encrypted and therefore, intrinsically not secure. Therefore I will not answer clinical concerns/questions via email and encourage you not to disclose private health information via my website or email. Instead, please call to make an in-person or telehealth appointment.

Because I am not a member of HMOs nor am I a provider for PPOs, I do not use electronic transmission of billing information to obtain payment. I am exclusively a fee-for-service provider and will bill you directly. You may, however, choose to be reimbursed by your insurance company.

What does being an Associate therapist mean?

What does being an Associate therapist mean?

AMFT stands for Associate Marriage and Family Therapist. My AMFT license number is #132992.

Being an Associate means I have finished my Master’s degree, am registered as an associate therapist in the state of California, and am in the years-long process of accumulating hours towards independent/full licensure. Among other things, California requires that an associate accrue 3,000 hours to become independently licensed. When all requirements have been met, I will become an LMFT (Licensed Marriage and Family therapist). I began seeing clients and accruing hours in 2020.

Associates are also required to be supervised by an LMFT or LCSW (Licensed Clinical Social Worker). My supervisor is Jeni Woodfin, LMFT #10744. You can read more about her here.


How can I save money and get therapy?

How can I save money and get therapy?

One option is to contact your insurance provider to see what options you have.

Beyond that, there are many organizations and nonprofits that provide free or reduced fee services. I have many listed on my resources page.

You can also consider other support options, such as group therapy, meditation groups, support groups offered by religious/secular organizations, AA, or similar anonymous networks. Many of these services are inexpensive or even free. Again, hop over to my resources page.

Having a strong therapeutic relationship is very closely related to successful outcomes in therapy. Remember, I offer a free 15-minute phone consultation prior to making a first appointment. You have no financial risk in calling and exploring your options. During the call we can discuss if I currently have any sliding scale spots open. 

Finally to our local teachers. You have your work cut out for you! I know from personal experience that teaching the next generation is one of the most important jobs a person could have, and is greatly misunderstood and underappreciated. I do offer sliding scale slots, so please asked about a reduced rate during our consultation.



What’s your social media policy?

What’s your social media policy?

The content on my Facebook, Instagram and website are for personal, marketing and/or informational purposes only and are not intended to be a substitute for professional services of any kind.

If you find me on these pages please understand that for your privacy and protection, I do not interact with clients on these platforms (for example friending, liking or commenting on your profile or content).

If you have questions, comments, or concerns about my presence on the internet, please talk to me directly and I will address your concerns in the best way befitting your therapy.



I had a negative experience with a therapist. What can I do about it?

I had a negative experience with a therapist. What can I do about it?

The Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS) receives and responds to complaints regarding services provided within the scope of practice of Marriage and Family Therapists and Professional Clinical Counselors. This includes Associate MFT’s and Associate PCC’s.

You may contact the board online at www.bbs.ca.gov, or by calling (916) 574-7830 to file a complaint.